Scientists are confused by the mysterious holes constantly found at the bottom of the deep Atlantic Ocean

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2022-08-05 02:09:44

On an expedition to the unexplored depths north of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, marine researchers stumbled upon something strange: tiny holes unearthed in sediments. , all of which are arranged into dozens of relatively regular straight lines.

These undersea holes aren’t overly complicated, but they’re scattered in an incredibly neat pattern, and most oddly spaced. About 2.5 kilometers (1.6 miles) below the surface of the Atlantic Ocean, they look as if they were made by human hands (which is hard to believe).

The rows of holes are evenly spaced on the bottom of the Atlantic Ocean.

On July 23, researchers aboard the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) Okeanos Explorer used a robotic submersible to explore an underwater volcanic ridge to the south. north of the Azores, near mainland Portugal.

About a week later, the researchers identified four more sets of holes about 483 kilometers (300 miles) away, at a depth of 1.6 kilometers (1 mile). Now NOAA researchers are asking for help from the public to come up with a plausible explanation for what they’ve discovered.

“While these holes look as if they were man-made, the small piles of sediment around them indicate they have been excavated. We have tried but have not been able to see and poke deep into the holes with the tools above. remote control vehicle,” NOAA described in a press release.

Scientists are confused by the mysterious holes constantly found at the bottom of the deep Atlantic Ocean - Photo 2.

Close-up of small holes and surrounding sediment.

To add to the mystery, this is not the first time scientists have seen such holes in the ocean floor. They have baffled researchers for at least 20 years.

A 2004 article reported a sighting in the same area that year. The researchers called them “lebensspuren” to describe the holes, which means “traces of life” in German.

The origin of the pits or how they were created remains a great curiosity and is not yet known. The sediment around the crater shows that it seems that some foreign organism has extruded the seabed soil. However, the researchers have not yet obtained any evidence for any signs of living organisms inhabiting these holes.

In the end, they were forced to collect samples of the surrounding sediments for further study in hopes of shedding light on whether something lived in the ocean floor.

Scientists are confused by the mysterious holes constantly found at the bottom of the deep Atlantic Ocean - Photo 3.

The holes in the ocean floor are still a mystery to researchers.

Having worked on both the recent expedition and the 2004 incident, NOAA marine biologist Michael Vecchione is on a quest to uncover the truth of what lurks beneath the mid-Atlantic sands.

“There’s something important going on there and we don’t know what it is. This makes clear the fact that there are still mysteries out there for us to uncover,” Vecchione said.

The Mid-Atlantic Ridge is the longest mountain range in the world, stretching 10,000 miles, a place most humans cannot afford to explore. Therefore, this mountain range becomes a priority focus for NOAA’s Travel 2022 expedition, which will take place from May to September 2022.

Scientists are confused by the mysterious holes constantly found at the bottom of the deep Atlantic Ocean - Photo 4.

The Mid-Atlantic Ridge, the mid-Atlantic ridge, runs for 10,000 miles.

In addition, NOAA is also looking at the Charlie-Gibbs Fault Zone, which intersects the mountainside and the Azores Plateau, in the eastern Atlantic Ocean.

The Mid-Atlantic Ridge is an earthquake hotspot, and is also home to beautiful hydrothermal vents, where the heat-providing magma is used for life at the deep sea poles.

The missions of NOAA’s Expedition 2022 expedition are to learn more about those mysterious lives, including the origin of the strange holes.

Refer to Science Alert


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